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Sunday, November 29, 2020 | History

3 edition of People with learning disability who have offended or are at risk of offending found in the catalog.

People with learning disability who have offended or are at risk of offending

Chris Kiernan

People with learning disability who have offended or are at risk of offending

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Published by Hester Adrian Research Centre in Manchester .
Written in English


Edition Notes

On cover: Communicare NHS Trust and Hester Adrian Research Centre.

StatementChris Kiernan and Clare Dixon.
ContributionsDixon, Clare., Hester Adrian Research Centre., Communicare NHS Trust.
The Physical Object
Pagination39p. ;
Number of Pages39
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18606936M
ISBN 101899617043

Theories to explain offending behaviour Offending behaviour - why do people do it? Human behaviour is complex and individuals act in response to many factors including socio-economic status, neighbourhood, peer group, personality and so forth. Finding single causes to explain why some people offend, and some offend repeatedly, is probably not. Risk Assessment in People with Learning Disabilities, Second Edition reflects legislative updates made over the past decade while continuing to demystify the process of assessing risk for people with intellectual impairment (previously called learning disabilities). Revisits techniques of risk assessment outlined in First Edition in light of the recent legislative changes, most notably the.


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People with learning disability who have offended or are at risk of offending by Chris Kiernan Download PDF EPUB FB2

Working together: Improving lives for people with a learning disability or autism who have or may offend. Come and meet with organisations from across the South West of England who work with people who have a learning disability or autism or both, and who have offended or are at risk of offending.

There is considerable evidence that people with intellectual disability (PWID) are at an increased risk of offending and are overrepresented in correctional settings.

The link between learning disabilities and offending is well documented. Almost a quarter of prisoners under 18 in England and Wales have a learning disability, according to.

There are certain aspects of learning disabilities which increase the risk for an individual to experience mental health issues.

Failure to identify a learning disability at an early age and to consequently delay the provision of intensive, individualized instruction results in school failure. The Liaison and Diversion (L&D) Service works with people of all ages (including children and young people) with a wide range of vulnerabilities including poor mental health and learning disabilities, substance misuse and homelessness who have offended or are at risk of offending.

We support service users who have contact with police stations. A companion review of psychological interventions for those who have sexually offended or are at risk of offending has recently been updated (Kenworthy ; Dennis ), and it is important to note the underlying difference between the psychological and antilibidinal approaches with which this review is concerned (see below).

The objective of. The training from Respond takes two days and the main objectives are for support workers to be able to identify and understand the key features of sex offending and best practice in assessment and management of risk; show a knowledge of individual and group psychodynamic approaches to working with learning disabled sex offenders; and understand.

There have been a number of high profile cases of young autistic people being targeted and for recruitment and radicalised.

(O’Neill & Simpson: ) The workshop, funded by the Home Office, seeks to ensure that teachers and other professionals can support young people early through practical strategies and learning resources, including.

Yet the support they receive upon release is key to reducing the risk of re-offending. “When offenders with learning disabilities leave prison, they are usually ill-prepared for developing a new life in the community,” Yates said.

“When they leave they have few or. UK studies of people with learning disabilities have reported the prevalence of learning disabilities in the prison population as being 7% (Talbot, ) and a similar study in a London police station found rates of % (Young et al, ).

The essential resource to the most recent research and practice on offenders with intellectual and developmental disabilities The Wiley Handbook on Offenders with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities is a comprehensive compendium to the research and evidence supporting clinical work with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who offend or are at risk of offending.

Statistics from the government’s Forced Marriage Unit show a rise in the number of people with learning disabilities being reported who may have been subject to forced marriage, or at risk of it. The essential resource to the most recent research and practice on offenders with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

The Wiley Handbook on Offenders with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities is a comprehensive compendium to the research and evidence supporting clinical work with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who offend or are at risk of offending.

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour (JIDOB) is relevant for everyone involved in researching or supporting people with intellectual disabilities who are involved (or in danger of becoming involved) with the criminal justice or forensic health systems.

JIDOB publishes peer-reviewed articles on the latest international research and policy, as well as being a vital source. In this editorial, we have highlighted three recent documents that have a particular relevance to people with learning disabilities who have offended or are at risk of offending.

The ï¬ rst document is the new mental health policy for England No health without mental health (DH, a). Bristol Learning Disabilities is a team which provides a service across Avon: Bristol, Bath & North-East Somerset, South Glos and North Somerset, offering a specialist tertiary service to adults who have learning disabilities who have offended, are alleged to have offended, or who are considered at significant risk of offending.

Risk Assessment in People with Learning Disabilities, 2 nd Edition provides a step-by-step guide to the process of assessing and minimising risk in situations ranging from crossing the road to serious sexual offending. It offers a thoughtful, ‘person-centred’ approach, encourages empathy and explores the impact of risk decisions on both the person with intellectual impairment and those Reviews: 2.

A. Lovell, J. Bailey, Nurses’ perceptions of personal attributes required when working with people with a learning disability and an offending background: a qualitative study, Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, /jpm, 24, 1, (), (). This handbook aims to provide up-to-date information on forensic issues in people with learning disabilities.

It offers an introduction to working with people who have leaning disabilities and offending behaviour, or those who are at risk of offending behaviour, and looks at recent developments in services, treatment and legislation/5(1).

Tweed delivers two separate services; a unit providing assessment and treatment for men who have a learning disability and have offended or display offending type behaviour, and a.

Abstract. People with intellectual disabilities (ID) may be somewhat overrepresented in parts of the Criminal Justice System (CJS), but they are mostly not overrepresented in prisons in most Western countries. People with ID in the CJS are mostly male, from deprived social backgrounds, have mild or moderate (not severe) disabilities and often have mental health needs.

Glynis Murphy, Jonathan Mason, People with intellectual disabilities who are at risk of offending, Psychiatric and Behavioural Disorders in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, /CBO, (), ().

offended recognize the unique needs of those individuals who have concomitant intellectual disabilities and problematic sexual behaviors (IDPSB). Problematic sexual behaviors are defined in this context as sexually offensive conduct that places either the client or others at risk for harm or social prejudice.

The. A one-day workshop led by specialist Learning Disability practitioners from Mersey Care Specialist Support Team. The day will be structured in three parts: Sessions 1 & 2 - Presentations on risk, capacity and offending behaviour.

Session 3 - Introduction to the Individual Risk Mitigation Profile. These training events have been designed to incorporate up to date research and theoretical information relevant to working with individuals with learning disability and offending behaviours and practical training and experience of using and scoring the Individual Risk Mitigation Profile a tool designed to identify and mitigate areas of risk.

Background. People with an intellectual disability (ID) are a marginalised and vulnerable group. The available research suggests an association between ID and criminal offending [1–3]; this has served to propel public fear and reinforce perceptions of the need for social r, the evidence from which these conclusions have been drawn remains far from definitive, with significant.

People with an intellectual disability (ID) are a marginalised and vulnerable group. The available research suggests an association between ID and criminal offending [1–3]; this has served to propel public fear and reinforce perceptions of the need for social r, the evidence from which these conclusions have been drawn remains far from definitive, with significant.

Supporting Offenders with Learning Disabilities (SOLD) - The aim of SOLD is to reduce offending and improve support for offenders with learning disabilities in Scotland. Whilst they engage directly with people with learning disabilities, the beneficiaries of their work also includes people who have other significant communication difficulties.

Offending behaviour and intellectual disability has long been—erroneously—associated in the literature and this misattribution has shaped services for this population. In this chapter, the relationship between intellectual disability and criminality is described along with the impact on the care and treatment of people in this population.

Developments in the assessment of risk are outlined. Sex offender treatment programmes for men with learning disabilities who have perpetrated sex offences or inappropriate sexual behaviour have been show to have beneficial effects for in a number of studies.

The authors of this study set out to look at the treatments and compare two groups – offenders against adults and offenders against children.

Meanwhile about a quarter of child offenders have learning difficulties and around 60% have communication difficulties. One Big Problem. Numbers aside, it can be difficult to imagine even a fraction of what living with learning disabilities means, and how that might feel while in custody, court, prison or a probation setting.

These words give a. -- The problem of predicting risk -- Assessing risks and establishing care plans -- Everyday risks -- Parents with learning disabilities -- Self-harm, mental illness and risk -- Other mental disorders and associated risks -- Violence and offending in people with learning disabilities -- Sex offenders with learning disabilities -- offenders have learning difficulties or learning disabilities that interfere with their ability to cope within the criminal justice are at risk of re-offending because of unidentified needs and consequent lack of support and services;are unlikely to benefit from conventional programmes designed to address their offending behaviour;are.

Development and preliminary evaluation of a questionnaire on cognitions related to sex offending for use with individuals who have mild intellectual disabilities. Differences in the predictive validity of actuarial risk assessments in relation to sex offender type.

Aust, S. Is the Good Lives Model of offender treatment relevant to sex offenders with a learning disability.

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, 1(3), Ayland, L., and West, B. The Good Way model: A strengths-based approach for working with young people, especially those with intellectual disabilities. The Avon Forensic Community Learning Disabilities Team, formed inwas developed with the aim of identifying those who had convictions or allegations of offending made against them or were as risk of offending and, where possible, to divert them to community settings by providing therapeutic interventions and support.

This team attempted to avoid inappropriate imprisonment or admission to. Life Beyond Crime: What do those at risk of offending, prisoners and ex-offenders need to learn.

Edited by Paul Crane. Life Beyond Crime brings together in an insightful and passionate debate, through prose, poems and pictures the assembled first-hand experience and wisdom of more than 60 contributors responding to the question What do those at risk of offending, prisoners and ex-offenders. with mental health problems or learning disabilities who have offended or are at risk of offending, with the aim of bringing forward appropriate recommendations which are consistent with this wider review.

Neighbourhood policing. In most cases, the police are. The difficulties in identifying homeless people who also have learning disabilities are even greater. Homelessness and learning disabilities. People with learning disabilities already face health inequalities (Emerson et al, ) and a higher risk of exploitation, bullying and abuse (Lougheed and Farrell, ) compared with the general.

Supporting people with learning disabilities who have offended to live safely in the community: negotiating policy and practice to promote social inclusion and rehabilitation. Timescale. 01/01/ to 30/04/ Team Tony Holland Jessica Wheeler. Contact. Tony Holland Cambridge University Health Foundation Chair in Learning Disabilities.

MacIntyre On Track Forensic Support (OTFS) Our model/methodology A specialist service for people with learning disabilities or autism who have offended or are at risk of coming into contact with the criminal justice system The On Track Forensic Support model is uncomplicated and was originally established in 8.Worling, J.

R. (). Assessing sexual arousal with adolescent males who have offended sexually: Self report and unobtrusively measured viewing time. Sexual Abuse, 18, Worling, J. R. (). The assessment and treatment of deviant sexual arousal with adolescents who have offended sexually.

Journal of Sexual Aggression,18, Specialist supported living for people with learning disabilities who have significant behaviours of concern; those who have offended, or are at risk of offending; and/or those moving on from secure settings; Our Shared Lives services are delivered for adults with learning disabilities, including.